WREG wants to let you know what illnesses are currently going around in schools and communities around the Mid-South. We’ve partnered with Saint Francis and MedPost Urgent Care for the latest information and we want to hear from you, too.


Tennessee

  • A stomach virus continues to plague the Mid-South. Be sure to keep kids hydrated.
  • Pink eye and allergies are still heavy hitters this week.
  • New this week, we incurred a case of poisoning by ingestion of a household cleaner.In the event of a childhood poisoning, call 911 and seek help immediately if you notice any of the following symptoms:
    • Difficulty breathing
    • Severe throat pain
    • Burns on the lips or mouth
    • Convulsions
    • Unconsciousness
    • Extreme sleepiness
  • Do not try to make your child vomit. If your child has swallowed a strong acid, such as toilet bowl cleaner, or a strong alkali, such as drain or oven cleaner, vomiting could further injure her by bringing the burning substance back up through her throat and mouth
  • If your child doesn’t have any of the serious symptoms listed above, call your local poison control center. (Do not assume that your child is fineSome dangerous substances won’t cause a reaction immediately.)
  • If you don’t have the number handy, call the American Association of Poison Control Centers at (800) 222-1222 to be automatically redirected to your local poison control center.

PREVENTING TICK BITES:

Tick exposure can occur year-round, but ticks are most active during warmer months (April-September). Know which ticks are most common in your area.

BEFORE GOING OUTDOORS:

  • Know where to expect ticks. Ticks live in grassy, brushy, or wooded areas, or even on animals. Spending time outside walking your dog, camping, gardening, or hunting could bring you in close contact with ticks. Many people get ticks in their own yard or neighborhood.
  • Treat clothing and gear with products containing 0.5% permethrin. Permethrin can be used to treat boots, clothing and camping gear and remain protective through several washings. Alternatively, you can buy permethrin-treated clothing and gear.
  • Use Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-registered insect repellents containing DEET, picaridin, IR3535, Oil of Lemon Eucalyptus (OLE), para-menthane-diol (PMD), or 2-undecanone. EPA’s helpful search tool can help you find the product that best suits your needs. Always follow product instructions.
    • Do not use insect repellent on babies younger than 2 months old.
    • Do not use products containing OLE or PMD on children under 3 years old.
  • Avoid Contact with Ticks
    • Avoid wooded and brushy areas with high grass and leaf litter.
    • Walk in the center of trails.

 AFTER COMING INDOORS:

·       Check your clothing for ticks. Ticks may be carried into the house on clothing. Any ticks that are found should be removed. Tumble dry clothes in a dryer on high heat for 10 minutes to kill ticks on dry clothing after you come indoors. If the clothes are damp, additional time may be needed. If the clothes require washing first, hot water is recommended. Cold and medium temperature water will not kill ticks.

·       Examine gear and pets. Ticks can ride into the home on clothing and pets, then attach to a person later, so carefully examine pets, coats, and daypacks.

·       Shower soon after being outdoors. Showering within two hours of coming indoors has been shown to reduce your risk of getting Lyme disease and may be effective in reducing the risk of other tick-borne diseases. Showering may help wash off unattached ticks and it is a good opportunity to do a tick check.

·       Check your body for ticks after being outdoors. Conduct a full body check upon return from potentially tick-infested areas, including your own backyard. Use a hand-held or full-length mirror to view all parts of your body. Check these parts of your body and your child’s body for ticks:

o   Under the arms

o   In and around the ears

o   Inside belly button

o   Back of the knees

o   In and around the hair

o   Between the legs

o   Around the waist

What’s Going Around where you live?

Let us know by sending a message to the address below, and be sure to include your location in the message.

news@wreg.com

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