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WREG wants to let you know what illnesses are currently going around in schools and communities around the Mid-South. We’ve partnered with Saint Francis and MedPost Urgent Care for the latest information and we want to hear from you, too.


Tennessee

  • Ear infections
  • Upper respiratory infections
  • Skin conditions, including dermatitis and ring worm
  • Gastroenteritis (stomach flu)
  • Seasonal allergies

With the school year commencing, the opportunity for catching a myriad of infectious illnesses increases given the number of children in close quarters. Many parents want to know if giving their child a multi-vitamin can be beneficial in boosting their immunity.

Actually, multivitamins aren’t necessary for most healthy children who are growing normally. Foods are the best source of nutrients. Regular meals and snacks can provide all the nutrients most preschoolers need.

 While many young children are picky eaters, that doesn’t necessarily mean that they have nutritional deficiencies. Many common foods — including breakfast cereal, milk and orange juice — are fortified with important nutrients, such as B vitamins, vitamin D, calcium and iron. So your child may be getting more vitamins and minerals than you think.

Talk with your child’s doctor if you’re concerned about whether your child is getting the recommended level of vitamins and minerals.

 When it comes to children staying health in school, it’s time to go back to the basics.

  • Frequent hand-washing is one of the simplest — and most effective — ways to prevent the spread of germs. Remind your child to wash his or her hands:
    • Before eating food
    • After using the toilet
    • After blowing his or her nose, coughing, or sneezing
  •  In addition to frequent hand-washing, encourage your child to:
    • Use hand sanitizer. Give your child alcohol-based hand sanitizer to use when hand-washing isn’t possible.
    • Cover your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze. Teach your child to cough or sneeze into a tissue — then toss it. If it isn’t possible to reach a tissue in time, remind your child to cough or sneeze into the crook of his or her arm.
    • Keep your hands away from your eyes, nose and mouth. Remind your child that germs spread this way.
    • Steer clear of colds. When possible, help or encourage your child to avoid close contact with anyone who has a cold.

PREVENTING TICK BITES:

Tick exposure can occur year-round, but ticks are most active during warmer months (April-September). Know which ticks are most common in your area.

BEFORE GOING OUTDOORS:

  • Know where to expect ticks. Ticks live in grassy, brushy, or wooded areas, or even on animals. Spending time outside walking your dog, camping, gardening, or hunting could bring you in close contact with ticks. Many people get ticks in their own yard or neighborhood.
  • Treat clothing and gear with products containing 0.5% permethrin. Permethrin can be used to treat boots, clothing and camping gear and remain protective through several washings. Alternatively, you can buy permethrin-treated clothing and gear.
  • Use Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-registered insect repellents containing DEET, picaridin, IR3535, Oil of Lemon Eucalyptus (OLE), para-menthane-diol (PMD), or 2-undecanone. EPA’s helpful search tool can help you find the product that best suits your needs. Always follow product instructions.
    • Do not use insect repellent on babies younger than 2 months old.
    • Do not use products containing OLE or PMD on children under 3 years old.
  • Avoid Contact with Ticks
    • Avoid wooded and brushy areas with high grass and leaf litter.
    • Walk in the center of trails.

 AFTER COMING INDOORS:

·       Check your clothing for ticks. Ticks may be carried into the house on clothing. Any ticks that are found should be removed. Tumble dry clothes in a dryer on high heat for 10 minutes to kill ticks on dry clothing after you come indoors. If the clothes are damp, additional time may be needed. If the clothes require washing first, hot water is recommended. Cold and medium temperature water will not kill ticks.

·       Examine gear and pets. Ticks can ride into the home on clothing and pets, then attach to a person later, so carefully examine pets, coats, and daypacks.

·       Shower soon after being outdoors. Showering within two hours of coming indoors has been shown to reduce your risk of getting Lyme disease and may be effective in reducing the risk of other tick-borne diseases. Showering may help wash off unattached ticks and it is a good opportunity to do a tick check.

·       Check your body for ticks after being outdoors. Conduct a full body check upon return from potentially tick-infested areas, including your own backyard. Use a hand-held or full-length mirror to view all parts of your body. Check these parts of your body and your child’s body for ticks:

o   Under the arms

o   In and around the ears

o   Inside belly button

o   Back of the knees

o   In and around the hair

o   Between the legs

o   Around the waist

What’s Going Around where you live?

Let us know by sending a message to the address below, and be sure to include your location in the message.

news@wreg.com

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