CLARKSBURG, W.Va. (WBOY) — On Tuesday, we will witness the last total lunar eclipse — also called a Blood Moon — until March 14, 2025, but that’s not the only exciting thing about it.

“This is the first time in U.S. history that we’re enjoying an Election Day Total Lunar Eclipse. It’s never happened before and won’t happen again until 2394,” according to Almanac.com.

According to NASA, a lunar eclipse occurs when the sun, moon and Earth align, causing the moon to pass into Earth’s shadow. A total lunar eclipse happens when the moon as a whole falls within the darkest part of Earth’s shadow.

Due to how light is scattered in Earth’s atmosphere, this will turn the moon a reddish hue, making it a Blood Moon.

“The more dust or clouds in Earth’s atmosphere during the eclipse, the redder the Moon will appear,” NASA says. “It’s as if all the world’s sunrises and sunsets are projected onto the Moon.”

So how do you view the event?

According to the Almanac, the partial eclipse will begin on Nov. 8 at 4:09 a.m. ET, followed by the start of the full eclipse at 5:16 a.m. ET. The full eclipse will end at 6:41 a.m. ET, with the partial eclipse ending at 7:49 a.m. ET.

If cloud cover is minimal, the total lunar eclipse will be visible in the Pacific Northwest and across North and Central America. So long as you are in the right area at the right time, you should be able to see the eclipse with the naked eye, weather permitting.

That being said, binoculars or a telescope will certainly help, especially in a dark environment away from bright lights. But even if you are in a bad area for it, there are many live streams and videos to choose from online.