Tornadoes hit more than 250 buildings across Mississippi

Robert Scott looks through a family Bible that he pulled out of the rubble Sunday, April 14, 2019, from his Seely Drive home outside of Hamilton, Miss., after an apparent tornado touched down Saturday night. (AP Photo/Jim Lytle)

JACKSON, Miss. — Early assessments show Saturday’s tornado outbreak damaged more than 250 homes, businesses and public buildings across Mississippi.

The National Weather Service has counted at least 10 tornadoes in Mississippi on Saturday, ranging from Escatawpa on the Gulf Coast as far north as Greenwood Springs in Monroe County.

The worst damage is around Hamilton in Monroe County, where one man died. Emergency managers say 130 homes, 14 apartments, two businesses and three public buildings are damaged or destroyed there.

Gov. Phil Bryant visited Hamilton on Monday. The Mississippi Emergency Management Agency set up a mobile command center there providing workspace and augmenting communications while cell and radio towers are repaired.

In Warren County, including Vicksburg, preliminary assessments show 50 homes, 15 businesses and three public buildings were damaged or destroyed.

The National Weather Service says more than a dozen tornadoes have been confirmed in the South after a weekend of violent weather that left at least eight people dead.

The agency says a survey team found evidence of an EF-3 twister with winds of at least 136 mph near Weches, Texas, and two other smaller tornadoes touched down in the same region Saturday. Another EF-3 twister flattened part of Franklin, Texas.

The system moved eastward into Mississippi, where the weather service says teams have confirmed eight tornadoes. And at least three weak tornadoes struck Alabama on Sunday.

The weather says the numbers could go up because teams are still assessing damage.

Four people were killed in Texas. The other victims died in Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama.

Meanwhile, much of the eastern Great Lakes and mid-Atlantic woke up Monday to damaged buildings, closed schools, and dark homes and businesses after powerful storms that spawned at least one confirmed tornado.

Notice: you are using an outdated browser. Microsoft does not recommend using IE as your default browser. Some features on this website, like video and images, might not work properly. For the best experience, please upgrade your browser.