Weather-related closings

Riding without rules? City council wants to establish regulations for shared bikes, scooters

MEMPHIS, Tenn. -- WREG found a Bird scooter on Main Street in downtown Memphis.

It's the latest shared mobility option in the Bluff City.

But as the scooters, along with the Explore Bikes have rolled into town, so too have concerns about a lack of rules and regulations.

"My concern is that we don`t have an overall plan," said Memphis City Council member Patrice Robinson.

WREG spoke with Memphis City Council members Robinson and Worth Morgan.

At Tuesday's council meeting, they plan to discuss an ordinance to establish rules and regulations for shared use bikes and scooters.

"Just making sure everybody`s playing by the same rules, that it`s fair and that we make sure that these companies are being responsible and do what they say they`re going to do in terms of clean up and maintenance of the different bikes and scooters they`re bringing in," said Morgan of his thoughts and concerns.

WREG replied, "Shouldn`t these be questions that the city asks ahead of time?"

Morgan explained, "Those are questions we`ve been asking ahead of time," and added that Bird is already operating in 15 cities.

The scooters in Memphis came from Nashville which got rid of the program after a serious accident, issues with regulations and the scooters being dumped and left across the city.

Similar stories have surfaced in other areas.

Morgan said however, "I think what happened in Nashville was a classic example of government making a mountain out of molehill and what we can do here, is have a better discussion up front, which we`re already having, and we`re going to have it again tomorrow, and making sure this is something that work."

Robinson said she wants to be sure the city establishes rules that guarantee safety, but at the same time, she said it's critical to focus on a more comprehensive plan for transportation.

"I know, I understand this is something fun for people to do, but how do we build that into our infrastructure for transporting people in Memphis."