Bright Spot: The Tennessee Virtual Academy

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MEMPHIS, Tenn. — It's not a traditional classroom but class is in session for 11-year-old Ben Messlein.

"We public school at home so he does public school just like in the classroom. He has his hours of school, he's got his homework, he's got his assignment and he does attend class live."

His favorite subject is science "because you get to do all of the experiments."

Mom Tammy says he's excelling in other subjects as well.

"He went from not reading to reading. He's kind of getting the hang of the math thing. It's taken a little while but they're working with him."

This is Ben's second year enrolled in Tennessee Virtual Academy. He has epilepsy, tourettes and ADHD, making  it difficult for him to attend a brick and mortar school.

"We don't have to worry about a teacher, worrying about how to handle a seizure. Or he's got tourettes so his ticks and things like that, so he's not disrupting the classroom."

Ben's virtual classes are taught by state certified teachers. He changes classes, has to log in on time and attendance is checked daily.

Tammy says the traditional classroom wasn't the best learning option for Ben.

"There's things you can do to get your kids the right education and to me it's not everybody just fits into this one box."

She says TNVA has been the perfect fit for her son and their family.

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