Leaders gather to honor Dr. King during wreath laying ceremony

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MEMPHIS, Tenn. —Civil Rights legend and Congressman John Lewis honored Dr. King's memory during a wreath-laying ceremony with other leaders at the Lorraine Motel.

As Amazing Grace sang in the background, Congressman Lewis first took a moment to stand in silence, reading the plaque that sits just below the balcony at the Lorraine Motel where Dr. Martin Luther King Junior was assassinated April 4th, 1968.

Congressman Lewis became emotional as he talked about meeting Dr. King at the age of 18.

"He changed my life, he inspired me to stand up and speak up and to never give up," Lewis said.

Lewis, who was traveling with Robert Kennedy when King was assassinated, said when King died the country suffered a loss that it's still working to heal.

"Something died in America and each day, I think we must find a way to dream the dreams that he dreamed and build on what he left all of us," Lewis said.

Building upon the dream part of the very reason Congressman Lewis and other leaders were in Memphis Friday.

There was a wreath-laying ceremony at the Lorraine Motel.

Memphis was the first stop for Lewis and a bipartisan delegation headed next to Alabama.

" I think of the progress that we have made that John Lewis` courage, the courage of the sanitation workers of Memphis helped to inspire," Tennessee Senator Lamar Alexander said.

Congressman Steve Cohen shared his thoughts after the ceremony.

"So many congress people are here and I hope they`re inspired by their visit to Memphis as well as their visits to Alabama," Cohen said.

Congressman Lewis said despite the tumultuous times our country is currently facing, he believes its young people who'll help get mankind to the promised land King talked about. And along the way, he says the fight for justice must continue.

"I always say that when you see something that is not right, not fair, not just, you have a moral obligation to say something. To do something."