Hickory Hill daycare part of WREG investigation to keep license, face penalties

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MEMPHIS, Tenn. — Building Blocks daycare in Hickory Hill will not lose its license.

The daycare has been fighting to stay open since they were issued a notice of revocation from the Department of Human Services several months ago.

The notice of revocation stemmed from a WREG investigation back in April.

In the investigation a  WREG employee was able to check out two children that attend the daycare. The investigation was done with the parent's permission.

An employee at Building Blocks did not ask the WREG employee for photo identification and did not call the children's parents. At the time the daycare employee pulled a file belonging to the wrong child and called the wrong parent.

The employee who released the children was terminated and the daycare also completed a plan of action to prevent mistakes in the future.

After listening to two and a half days of testimony from witnesses with the Department of Human Services and witnesses on behalf of Building Blocks daycare the Childcare Agency Board of Review discussed the case for several hours.

The six board members said they did not think the daycare should lose it's license but were swift to say there should be penalties.

Ultimately, the board decided on a $400 civil penalty for the two violations.

A spokesperson with the Department of Human Services said Building Blocks Academy will also lose all of their stars for six months. The daycare currently has a three star organization, which is the highest rating.

The spokesperson said revoking a daycare's stars happens by rule when they are given a civil penalty and that the daycare will get their stars back after six months.

Throughout this process the attorney for Building Blocks has maintained that the investigation was a set up and that Building Blocks is a quality daycare that helps the community.

However an attorney with the Department of Human Services said they treat this case as if it was real and releasing a child to a stranger is a safety concern.

The board said releasing the children to an individual who was not on the approved list was a big problem, and the penalties that were handed down are an adequate punishment.