Will the DoD really shut down the power grid? No

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.

Courtesy of CBS News

MEMPHIS, Tenn. — A video claiming that the national power grid will soon go out for several days is causing panic on social media.

The video warns that the Department of Defense will be using an electromagnetic pulse to shutdown the power grid November 4 -6, and that everyone needs to prepare now.

While a training exercise is happening during that time period, the outcome has been exaggerated by reports online.

Routine communication interoperability training happens four times each year and involves various divisions of the DoD along with amateur radio operators and MARS organizations.  During the first week of November, these entities will come together to train under a simulated “very bad day” scenario.

A “very bad day” is any event in which the national power grid fails along with other forms of communication including landline phones, cell phones, satellites and internet connectivity.

They will also be practicing a solar storm scenario, but that too will be a simulation.

“The purpose of the training is to prepared for an event we hope will never happen, but should be ready for if it ever does,” said the Army Military Auxiliary Radio System (MARS).  “These exercises are all about coordinating existing capabilities like amateur radio, and citizen volunteers like MARS members, to be a productive part of the solution in the event something like a severe solar storm ever happens.”

During the exercise, they will not turn off the national power grid.