Murders are up in Memphis and more than two dozen other cities

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MEMPHIS, Tenn. -- The city of Memphis recorded its 85th homicide of the year this weekend.

That's 32 more than this time last year.

New data shows around 30 major cities have reported more homicides recently.

Everyone has their own theory on why:gang violence, drugs or a shortage of officers.

It's all problems that can't be fixed overnight.

"These streets are nothing to play with now. There's too much violence going on for no reason at all," said Alex Kimble who lives in Frayser.

Kimble said the recent violence is the worst she's seen.

"There are people I went to school with, people I know personally or grew up with that haven't made it to the age of 18," she said.

Memphis is on track to reach a record no one wants to claim.

New data compiled by the Major Cities Chiefs Association compared the murder rate in the first three months of 2015 to the first three of 2016.

Baltimore increased by five homicides.

San Antonio increased by 11.

Nashville went up 7, Atlanta 4, and Memphis 17.

Keep in mind, since the end of March Memphis' homicide rate almost doubled.

"We are getting to critical times in this city," said Memphis Police Association President Mike Williams.

He said city leaders haven't put enough attention expanding youth programs, helping parents or working with folks on conflict resolution.

"I haven't heard anyone who has come out officially and say this is how we plan to combat the problems in our city," said Williams.

City Council member Worth Morgan said the council and administration are working on solutions, but said it's not a problem that can be fixed overnight.

"This is a conversation that's being had every day downtown. We are working to implement situations everyday," said Morgan.

The new data did show a list of cities that have seen a decrease in homicides, but that doesn't make people in Memphis feel any better.

 

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