Suspect arrested in Ole Miss student’s death

188 crimes reported at Peppertree in five months, that’s not including shootings and murders

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.

MEMPHIS, Tenn. -- Memphis Police said from May to October, they've responded to a crime just about every day at the infamous Peppertree Apartments in Whitehaven.

The list included theft, drugs, assault, rape, weapons and trespassing.

The complex was also where a toddler was shot in the face while sleeping in her mother's arms a few weeks back.

"I got a little cousin that lives there, and I don't think it's safe at all," said Jennifer Ross who lives a street over.

Her concerns are justified.

MPD said from May 1 to October 22, 188 crimes were reported and that didn't include shootings and murders.

"This is unacceptable," said Memphis Councilman Harold Collins.

Collins said he would be turning the crime stats over to the federal government, so it knows what's going on in the complex it is funding.

He said he would also giving them another list of all the code violations cited at Peppertree recently from bed bugs to rodents to broken toilets and showers.

"This is not about putting people out of their homes. This is about providing a safe environment," said Collins.

PeppertreeĀ management never returned WREG's phone calls, and they haven't been answering to code enforcement either.

They even flaked on a meeting where they were supposed to present a plan on how to fix the problems.

"When you step into some of these places, it's horrible," said one tenant. "It's gangster's paradise!"

Collins was afraid the crime and problems will seep into the community.

"There's a high school right across the street. A community center right across the street. A major hospital right around the block," he said.

Code enforcement is supposed to go back out there and see if anything has been fixed.

In the meantime, Collins said he's sending a formal letter, the stats and violations to the federal government, lawmakers, both mayors and the district attorney.

Notice: you are using an outdated browser. Microsoft does not recommend using IE as your default browser. Some features on this website, like video and images, might not work properly. For the best experience, please upgrade your browser.