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MPD officer’s gun stolen from Oak Court Mall bathroom

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MEMPHIS, Tenn. -- Memphis police say an off-duty officer's firearm was stolen after he left it behind in the bathroom. By the time he realized he forgot it, the gun was already gone.

"That's pretty bad," Eric Gilliam said. "We've got enough guns on the street as is."

Gilliam added he's dumbfounded by this latest break in the case. He originally thought the gun was taken from the officer's car.

It turns out Monday night, Lester Hobbs was working his second job at Dillard's in Oak Court Mall when he went to use the bathroom, and then left his gun on the towel holder.

Gilliam calls it neglect of duty.

"When you are talking about a gun, yeah. There's no other way to look at it," he said.

Carol asked us not to use her last name, but says she goes to Oak Court Mall once a month with her grandkids. She couldn't imagine what would happen if they found a gun in the bathroom.

"I'm worried about my grandchildren more than anything. I hope this officer is reprimanded in some fashion," she said.

Police still don't have a suspect in this case. The security cameras in that part of the store weren't working at the time of this crime, which makes the job of finding the gun more difficult.

Gilliam said, "I believe it was a mistake; everyone makes mistakes."

13 comments

  • dada

    not to worry some little gang banger got, an he will probably shoot Ladarious but hit 7 month old Lakeshi as she sleeps in crib

  • Comedy of errors

    Oak Court has turned into murders, mayhem, and thugs and yet the cameras were not working. Is there any semblance of sanity, responsibility left on this planet. Everything is a comedy of errors and incompetence.

  • John T. Dwyer

    Take a deep breath people! Officer Hobbs isn’t the first to lose track of his pistol, rifle, shotgun, tear gas bombs, badge, jacket, holster, handcuffs, knight stick, hat, gun belt, radio, squad car, and he won’t be the last.

    Note to Hobbs: Tell the truth next time, take the days and repay the city for the pistol. Embarrassing? You bet. But a whole lot better than having “Will Lie At The Drop Of A Hat” in your personnel file. Will be brought up at every trial you have. AND they can fire you for neglect of duty, if they decide to be nasty about it. That will keep you from being ever hired as a cop or security guard in the future.

    • You Know Who

      But John, you miss the point completely. If a regular citizen would have reported that he left his gun on the towel holder and someone had stolen it they would be charged with everything under the sun. And should that gun be used in a crime they would probably be charged with accessory to that crime.

      to “earn” the respect of the community the police need to be held to a HIGHER standard, not be given amunity for what others would be charged for.

      • John T. Dwyer

        @youknowwho:
        Not so fast on charging the officer.
        Every day, and even back 21 years ago, people were having their weapons stolen out of their cars, trucks, and bedrooms, etc. We are not talking about one or two weapons…we are talking about thousands of pistols and rifles. Not one person has ever been charged in the theft of these weapons. If we charged them…the jails would have been overcrowded! The Legislature in their haste to authorize weapons carry permits only stipulated stand your ground as a civil/criminal defense. My question is: How many weapons are out there that have “NOT” been reported gone out of embarrassment?
        It also scares me that many women are carrying pistols in their purses, which get snatched every day! I guess they figure they can call “King’s X” to give them time to pull the weapon out and away from their compacts, etc.

        I will admit it is bad for this officer having been untruthful at first, and then coming clean. Misdemeanor false reporting is one charge, Neglect of duty is another, which, is what he should be facing for leaving this weapon behind like this. However, he is human and subject to mistakes.

        Officers should be held to higher standards, but not to where we hang them for situations where we would excuse ourselves from harmless errors and actions of bad judgement.

      • Andre

        I don’t know who told youthat youwouldbe charged if youlied about losing your weapon as a civilian BUT that’s a lie. Once you repot the weapon stolen, lost, or whatever. You cannot be charged with a crime that happens with the weapon because the official paperwork is that you no longer possess the weapon. If you lie about that and the truth is that you still have the weapon, then you can be charged for false reporting and whatever crime the weapon was involved in. Please people read a book, a statue before we make assumptions and comments about what we think and not what we know. IJS

  • MikeBarret

    Everybody has a moment sometimes. You never locked your keys in your car, ever? Give the officer a break. I don’t trust any police but he gets the benefit of the doubt like anyone else should.

  • James

    WHO does not make mistakes? No human is infallible. Old and young, learned and unlearned, rich and poor, men and women, one and all are imperfect, and so make mistakes.
    James 3:2 says, “For we all stumble many times. If anyone does not stumble in word, he is a perfect man, able to bridle also his whole body.”

  • Rude Druid

    MPD — SO typical. So pathetic. And the MPA will defend this imbecile to the death, of course.

    And another officer was convicted yesterday of trying to frame two innocent guys so he could give his girlfriend a free DVD player that he tried to steal from the two innocent guys.

    THIS is the police department that resulted from King Willie’s hiring policies.

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