‘The dream is not dead’ Disabled veteran joins hundreds to remember Dr. King’s legacy days after being shot

MEMPHIS, Tenn. --A disabled veteran joins hundreds in remembrance of Dr. King's death and the legacy of is dream days after being shot on Easter.

67-year-old Andrew Gillard remembers when the Memphis Marine Corp unit was called in to be notified that Dr. King had been killed.

Gillard was only 18-years-old when Dr. King was killed and, he still remembers the impact it had on him and those around him.

That's why he felt the need to honor the dream of racial equality and a living wage at the MLK50 ceremony.

"Today the dream still lives on," Gillard said. "The same goes for Malcolm X and all the great black leaders who helped us continue to move along the path."

For Gillard "the dream is still alive", especially after he says he was a victim of "black on black violence" after an Easter dinner ended with him getting shot.

Gillard said he invited his neighbors to his home on Silverage for Easter dinner like he does every holiday.

He cooks for anyone who's hungry.

"I set plates out. We were having a nice time!" he told WREG.

Gillard said as dinner came to an end, one guest became unruly.

"I asked him to leave my home. I escorted him to the front door. I opened the screen door. He shot me through the storm door," he said.

Gillard was shot once in the chest and once in the back.

Doctors told him they couldn't remove the bullets, but thankfully, he'll be okay.

"I'm blessed. I'm not lucky. I'm blessed," said Gillard.

He says he is blessed because this is the second time someone shot him.

A young man he helped ended up shooting him in the stomach and hand four years ago.

Police are once again involved.

Officers are working to catch Sunday's shooter as Gillard just asks how someone could have such little regard for life.

"Once again, I have become a victim," he said.