Memphis firefighter keeps the faith after near fatal car accident

MEMPHIS, Tenn. — "One thing I learned is that I can't feel sorry for myself."

Keith Bond is glad to be alive.

A Memphis firefighter for 23 years, Bond was used to putting his life on the line.

But one night in November 2016, everything changed when Bond crashed into an 18-wheeler.

His car was trapped beneath the big rig for hours.

He was unconscious and clinging to life.

"When I woke up, it was probably two months later," Bond said.

He spent two months in the critical care unit with his sister by his side, praying for his recovery.

When the accident happened, it was like 11:30 night," Bond said. "She lives five hours away. She got up and came to be beside me. She hasn't left since then."

The crash left him with many broken bones and a serious brain injury. "My balance was off. The way I communicated, it took longer. I had to think about everything I wanted to say."

Doctors were unsure of his future, but his mother and sister remained faithful.

They knew their prayers would be answered.

"I would look in the mirror and tell myself, 'Okay, you are alive. You are breathing. It's going to be a good day. Suck it up and do what you have to do. You have a long way to go," Bond said.

"It's been a struggle for Bond to re-learn things he used to take for granted - like walking, driving and paying bills. Every area of his life was affected.

"I found a DVD. It was of me skydiving a year before my accident. Of course, right now if you asked me to do that I would say there is no way," Bond said laughing.

He views life differently these day and values his second chance at life.

"I'm just as happy as I was when I was jumping out of the plan. When I jump out of bed and I'm able to walk, I feel the same excitement, I really do," he said.