‘Black Panther’ connections to the Mid-South

MEMPHIS, Tenn.— Black Panther fever swept the Mid-South Friday, with fans flocking to the theater to see the breakthrough film and other who took part in the making of the movie giving back to the community.

Carrie Bernans, who stars in the film, wanted Shelby County School students she visited to know she’s just like them. The Black Panther star took time out of her busy Hollywood schedule to fly home to Memphis for just 12 hours visiting several Shelby County Schools including Grandview Heights Middle in Frayser.

“It was so important for me to show kids no matter where you come from, you can make it,” Bernans said.

Bernans isn’t the only one with Memphis ties involved in the blockbuster movie.

Jesse Holland was born in Holly Springs and spent part of his childhood in Orange Mound. he’s now an author in Maryland and Marvel tapped him to write the Black Panther novel, 'Black Panther: Who is The Black Panther?'

“My dad for years taught in Memphis city schools," Holland said. “If you want to know more about the characters you're seeing on the screen, my novel is a great place to start."

Holland says fans will see Southern values including the importance of family in the film. Others we spoke with saw something they don’t usually get to see elsewhere.

Patrick Thompson, who was attending the movie with his parents, said he and his friends like black superheros because there isn't a lot of them. Tommy Scales agreed.

“It’s so important to know the culture of America, the black culture and experience something new. It’s something that’s never happened before in theaters,” Scales said.

“It’s about time that we see something other than slavery movies with a black cast. I think it’s great,” Bernans said.

And in the end, after fans bought tickets, got dressed up and wait in line, they really just wanted one thing.

“I’m looking for a good movie. I love the director,” Ivan Moore said.

Check here for Black Panther showtimes in your area.