NRA, Republicans open to regulations on bump stock devices

WASHINGTON — The National Rifle Association says the “bump stocks” device that the Las Vegas shooter used to turn semi-automatic rifles into fully automated weapons should be “subject to additional regulations.”

In a statement on Thursday, the NRA says the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives should immediately review whether these devices comply with federal law.

The organization which holds a powerful sway over members of Congress dismissed some of the initial response from lawmakers who have pressed for more gun control.

Said the NRA: “Banning guns from law-abiding Americans based on the criminal act of a madman will do nothing to prevent future attacks.”

The statement came from NRA leaders Wayne LaPierre and Chris Cox.

Both of Tennessee’s Republican senators — Sen. Lamar Alexander and Sen. Bob Corker — said Thursday that they either were reviewing bump-stock legislation or that Congress should review it. Neither said whether they had decided to support or oppose regulations.

The White House says President Donald Trump welcomes a review of U.S. policy on so-called bump stock devices that legally make semi-automatic rifles into faster-firing automatic weapons.

Presidential spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders told reporters Thursday that “we’re certainly open to having that conversation.”

The top Republican in the House says he’s open to considering a possible ban on bump stocks.

Speaker Paul Ryan said in an interview with MSNBC that aired Thursday it’s “clearly something we need to look into.”

The comments from lawmakers including No. 2 Senate Republican John Cornyn of Texas mark a surprising departure from the GOP’s general antipathy to gun regulations of any kind.