Las Vegas police release bodycam footage from mass shooting

LAS VEGAS — The Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department released body camera footage from the night a gunman opened fire on a crowded music festival, killing 58 and injuring more than 500 people.

The video — which includes video from multiple officers — begins as one group of officers duck for cover across the street from the Mandalay Bay Hotel as gunfire rained down from above.

Law enforcement immediately begin trying to figure out where the shots are coming from while yelling at residents and tourists to get down.

“Hey, you guys, get down!” one officer screams at panicked concertgoers. “Get out of here! There are gun shots coming from over there, go that way!”

“Hey, they’re shooting right at us, guys. Everybody stay down. Stay down!”

“Where’s it at? ”

“North of the Mandalay Bay. It’s coming out of a window.”

It took about 10 minutes of gunfire for Stephen Paddock to carry out the deadliest mass shooting in modern US history.

From his position at a Las Vegas hotel, Paddock fired a barrage of bullets at 22,000 concertgoers below at a country music festival — made possible through what appeared to be meticulous planning.

The shooter had checked into a hotel room overlooking the music festival, stocked a cache of weapons there and set up cameras inside his hotel suite and hallway.

The first call of shots being fired came Sunday, 10:08 p.m. and the gunfire stopped at 10:19 p.m., said Clark County Undersheriff Kevin McMahill on Tuesday. He said the shooting went off and on for nine to 11 minutes.

No one knows why Paddock gunned them down.

But authorities are hoping for clues as his girlfriend, Marilou Danley returned to the United States Tuesday night from the Philippines. She is being accompanied by the FBI in Los Angeles, where Las Vegas police plan to question her, a law enforcement source told CNN.

Police believe Paddock acted alone.

He had an arsenal of weapons, including bump-fire stocks found in the hotel, which is a legal device that enables a shooter to fire bullets rapidly, similar to an automatic rifle. Paddock had outfitted 12 of his firearms with the bump stocks, according to the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.

The shooter also had cameras set up inside and outside the suite. Police are not aware whether the devices were transmitting — the FBI is investigating their use — but the Clark County sheriff told reporters he thinks Paddock might have used them to watch for people approaching his room. One camera looked out the peephole on the suite’s door.

The hail of gunfire stopped when security guards approached Paddock’s Mandalay Bay hotel room, McMahill said. Paddock turned his attention to those outside his door and fired, wounding a security guard who was advancing towards his room.

The security guard was “very heroic” and provided police with information about the shooter’s location, McMahill said. When officers entered the hotel room, they found Paddock dead. Authorities believe he killed himself.

A total of 47 guns have been recovered from three locations: Paddock’s hotel room and his two Nevada homes in Verdi and Mesquite. The guns were bought in Nevada, Utah, California and Texas, said Jill Snyder, special agent in charge of ATF field division in San Francisco.

Thousands of rounds of ammunition were found in his Mesquite home and an ingredient used in explosives was discovered inside the shooter’s car.

Authorities are also investigating whether the shooter had planned for an earlier attack, CBS News has confirmed.

The news agency was told Paddock may have first planned to attack the Life is Beautiful festival in late September. He had reportedly requested specific rooms at The Ogden and a second hotel in Las Vegas during the festival dates, but they had already been booked.