Ministers pass along MLK’s memory through commemorative teach-in

MEMPHIS, Tenn. — In a time where protests are plenty, to prevent riots and bring about the right kind of change the MLK 50 commemorative teach-ins giving future leaders the tools they need to properly carry the baton –Martin Luther King Jr. passed along.

"We need a new generation of ministers who are willing to use their faith to lead people literally into the promise land," said Ernest Brooks President of Academy of Teachers.

They’re looking to use the pulpit to push the movement gaining momentum as some people grow tired of social injustices plaguing society and search for the right way to respond.

"People of faith, religious leaders have been called to speak out on behalf of the lost the left out the marginalized and those who don’t have a voice," said Brooks.

These ministers say it's not a new approach but with everything brewing—it’s time to bring back something that seemed to work.

"I remember from the 60’s there were teach-ins and I haven’t seen that term in a long time," said Cheryl Sanders a professor of Christian ethics at Howard University.

With the turn of the 21st century, the need for them seemed to fade but now these brothers and sisters

In faith say—teach-ins could restore unity and continue MLK’s vision.

"I think the last two years have demonstrated that white racism is still alive and well," said Ron Sider, President of  Evangelicals for Social Action.

It’s an important time for those who watched oppression turn into progression—then blinked and saw hate creep back.

"The gospel itself was designed to bring about liberation and to help people who were struggling," said Moses Goldman a Lane College Chaplain.

"Leaning on the Bible as a lamp onto the feet of those chosen to lead the way."

Thumbing through the pages and paragraphs of scriptures to light the path towards a brighter future filled with unity no matter color or creed.