Spring Break brings out more kids behaving badly

MEMPHIS, Tenn. -- For the second time this week, teens in stolen cars tried to outrun officers, ending with smashed squad cars and jail time.

Experts say there's a spike in crime during spring break, and that social media is adding to the problem.

The latest example happened early Thursday morning, when four teens running from police in a stolen car streamed the chase on Facebook Live.

The video has been shared more than 13,000 times.

Those boys – just 15, 16 and 17 years old – ended up in handcuffs after blowing a tire and pulling into a hotel parking lot.

They made a break for it, but ultimately couldn't outrun police.

Earlier this week, a 16- and 19-year-old were taken into custody, accused of stealing a car downtown and leading police on a chase that ended in a crash.

Investigator Jimmy Chambers, with the Shelby County District Attorney's Office, says spring break brings out more kid criminals.

"They don't have any obligations to go to school or those types of things, so now they're free," he said. "They can go out and do what they want to do."

LaDell Beamon, with the organization Heal the Hood says social media has made it easy for teens to get attention for all the wrong reasons.

"We do the most outrageous things to get the most views," he said. "If you're searching for validation, social media has given everybody the opportunity to become a star."

For Chambers, the solution is simple: He says it begins and ends with the parents.

"If you don't raise them the way they're supposed to go, they're going to go out and hurt somebody," he said. "The jails are gonna get full with these young kids in the street being stupid."

The teens from Thursday morning's chase are now charged with auto theft, and the driver is also charged with evading arrest.

It's still unclear what charges the teens from Tuesday's chase could be facing.