Republicans turn up heat on AG Sessions

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WASHINGTON — The Russian cloud hovering over the Trump White House engulfed Attorney General Jeff Sessions Thursday following revelations he failed to disclose pre-election meetings with the Kremlin’s ambassador to Washington.

Several Republicans, many of them increasingly uneasy about the implications of the evolving Russian drama, called on Sessions to recuse himself from any involvement in an FBI probe into ties between the Trump campaign and Moscow.

“I think the attorney general should further clarify his testimony. And I do think he should recuse himself,” said Rep. Jason Chaffetz, the Republican chairman of the House Oversight Committee.

“Jeff Sessions is a former colleague and a friend, but I think it would be best for him & for the country to recuse himself from the DOJ Russia probe,” said Sen.Rob Portman, R-Ohio, in a statement.

“Attorney General Sessions should recuse himself from any investigation into Russia,” said Rep. Darrell Issa, R-California, in a statement. “We need a clear-eyed view of what the Russians actually did so that all Americans can have faith in our institutions.”

House Speaker Paul Ryan said Sessions should recuse himself if he’s part of an ongoing probe.

“If he, himself, is the subject of an investigation, of course he would,” Ryan told reporters Thursday. “But if he’s not, I don’t see any purpose or reason to doing this.”

Sessions: ‘This allegation is false’

Sessions strongly denied ever discussing campaign-related issues with anyone from Russia.

“I never met with any Russian officials to discuss issues of the campaign,” he said in a statement. “I have no idea what this allegation is about. It is false.”

Sessions’ spokeswoman Sarah Isgur Flores said there was nothing “misleading about his answer” to Congress because he “was asked during the hearing about communications between Russia and the Trump campaign — not about meetings he took as a senator and a member of the Armed Services Committee.”

“Last year, the senator had over 25 conversations with foreign ambassadors as a senior member of the Armed Services Committee, including the British,

Korean, Japanese, Polish, Indian, Chinese, Canadian, Australian, German and Russian ambassadors,” Isgur Flores said in the statement.

A Justice Department official confirmed the meetings, but said Sessions met with the ambassadors “in his capacity as a senator on the Armed Serviced Committee.”

A White House official said: “This is the latest attack against the Trump Administration by partisan Democrats. (Attorney) General Sessions met with the ambassador in an official capacity as a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, which is entirely consistent with his testimony.”

Meetings with Russian ambassador

According to the Justice Department, Sessions met with Kislyak in July on the sidelines of the Republican convention, and in September in his office when Sessions was a member of the Senate Armed Services committee.

Sessions, then the junior senator from Alabama, was an early Trump backer and regular surrogate for him as a candidate.

Kislyak is considered by US intelligence to be one of Russia’s top spies and spy-recruiters in Washington, according to current and former senior US government officials.

Kemlin spokesman Dmitri Peskov denied Russia has ever interfered and has no plans to ever interfere in the domestic affairs of other countries, speaking to journalists Wednesday.

When asked for reaction to the characterization of Kislyak as a spy, Peskov said “nobody has heard a single statement from US intelligence agencies’ representatives regarding our ambassador. Again, these are some depersonalized assumptions of the media that are constantly trying to blow this situation out of proportion.”

Kislyak’s interactions with Trump’s former national security adviser Mike Flynn led to Flynn being fired last month.

The Washington Post first reported on Sessions’ meetings with the ambassador.

The House Intelligence Committee signed off this week on a plan to investigate Russia’s alleged interference in the US elections, which includes examining contacts between Trump’s campaign and Russia, and looking into who leaked the details.

Democrats have called for an independent investigation.

Minnesota Sen. Al Franken, who asked Sessions about Russia at his confirmation hearing, said if the reports of Sessions’ contacts with Kislyak were true, then Sessions’ response was “at best misleading.”

“It’s clearer than ever now that the attorney general cannot, in good faith, oversee an investigation at the Department of Justice and the FBI of the Trump-

Russia connection, and he must recuse himself immediately,” Franken said.

The ranking Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, Rep. Adam Schiff, also said that Sessions should recuse himself if he didn’t reveal his interactions with the Russian Ambassador last year during his confirmation hearing.

“If it’s true that Sessions failed to disclose his meeting with Kislyak, he must recuse himself. This is not even a close call; it is a must,” he posted on Twitter.
This story is being updated with new developments.