This story shows why mentors matter

MEMPHIS, Tenn. -- William Terrell is a busy young lawyer specializing in civil litigation at Glassman, Wyatt, Tuttle & Cox.

He recently found out he's one of two lawyers selected from more than 150 for an international study program.

"I'm just a kid from Memphis who went to Memphis law, practices in Memphis. I never thought that they would pick me, so I was pretty excited."

Through the Inns of Court, a worldwide organization of lawyers and judges, William will spend six weeks studying law in London, Ireland and Scotland.

He'll study case law, but he'll also have the opportunity to bond with lawyers, judges and scholars outside the courtroom.

"Hopefully, I can learn something and apply it to my practice in America."

William is a native Memphian.

He graduated from White Station High school before attending undergrad and law school at the University of Memphis.

He works at a prestigious law firm, but admits he's had help on his journey.

"I never was rich, but I've been blessed with opportunities beyond measure."

That's why he encourages young Memphians to embrace the city.

He says building relationships is key to his thriving.

One of those relationships was with his mentor, Richard Glassman.

"Trying to help people the way people helped me.  Just kind of paying it forward.  There are plenty of people in D.C. to do that, plenty of people in New York to help with that, but I've been called to help here," said Glassman.

Richard and William met through Big Brothers Big Sisters.

It's just one way young people can connect with mentors.

There are various mentoring programs throughout the city.

Glassman says everyone has something to offer to a young person, "A lot of people say I'm just one person, I couldn't really help.  That's not true.  If one person helps one person, who helps one person, that makes a difference."

Over the years, the two and their families have become very close.

It may seem like an unlikely friendship, but both men say mentoring and being mentored changed their lives for the better.

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