“I Thought I Could Trust Her” – Push To Punish Revenge Porn In Tennessee

(WREG-TV) Pinning down an exact number of pornographic websites, or how much of the Internet they make up, is almost impossible.

It doesn’t help that these days, some people post pictures of, say, former boyfriends or girlfriends on social media as a form of revenge.

And while some states are passing laws to prevent revenge porn, Tennessee isn’t one of them.

To show loved ones and friends your pictures and videos, it’s as easy as click and send.”I thought I could trust her.”

But after University of Memphis student Trey Gamble sent explicit photos to a girl he befriended online, he learned his friend wasn’t all that trustworthy.

After he refused to send even more nude pictures, Gamble says his friend betrayed him and posted the ones she had of his privates on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

“That could have messed up my whole future,” Gamble said. “I was nervous for weeks, wondering if my mom would would see them, how I would look to my family, how I would represent them being a freshman year in college.”

Gamble had become a victim of so-called revenge porn.

Websites too scandalous and saucy to show you on the news are all over the Internet.

Their purpose? To embarass exes with XXX photos.

“You can never stop the trauma, the emotional distress that occurs, because it lasts forever.”

Revenge porn is already illegal in Virginia, California and New Jersey.

Tennessee State Representative GA Hardaway of Memphis wants to make it a crime here, too.

He introduced a bill that would make it a crime to to upload and share private photos online.

“The most embarrassing thing about revenge porn on the Internet is once it’s there, it’s there forever.”

Those moments  frozen in time, forever…

Kind of like Hardaway’s bill, which sat in Nashville for months this legislative session without any progress.

The session is now over, as are any chances for changing the law this year.

As for Gamble and his now ex-friend, he’s forgiven her.

“I was young and stupid,” he said. “It’s rare to find somebody that bold to do that, but she did it.”

Now Gamble, who’s majoring in education, is trying to help others avoid his mistake. It”s a lesson he hopes to pass on to his future students.

“Be careful what they send out,” he cautioned.

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