Train Runs Over Huge Alligator In St. Francis Co., AR

(St. Francis Co., AR) We all know “why” the chicken crossed the road?

The answer of course is…”to get to the other side.”

But why did a nine foot long alligator decide to the cross a St. Francis County railroad track?

Whatever the reason, it turned out to be a fatal mistake for the gator.

Now people are wondering how many more of the creatures could be calling the county home.

The huge alligator was lying across the Union Pacific railroad track west of Palestine, Arkansas, when a freight train hit it.

Robert Michaelis came to see the unusual sight, “We took pictures of it. It’s just something you don’t really see around here.”

The massive the gator measured at least nine feet long and looked a little too familiar to Kayla Lee, “Oh my gosh! That’s too close to home for us. That’s a little scary.”

She’s certain it’s the same gator that surprised her and her children recently in the family’s pond, “We stopped for my little boy to throw a rock in the pond. And we saw him going across the back-end of the pond.”

She’s worried about the safety of her small children and hopes there’s not a family of gators living nearby, “I┬ádon’t want them to be out there fishing. I’m afraid that there’s another one out there. And with them being little, that would be easy food for him.”

In this part of St. Francis County there’s no shortage of wildlife.

It’s not uncommon┬áto see snakes slithering in the ditch alongside the railroad track where the gator was killed.

There are occasional sightings of alligators in St. Francis County, but no one’s seen anything this size.

According to Donald Michaelis this “big fella” apparently took a liking to St. Francis County, “He’s been in the pond up here for the last three years. Everybody in the county’s been up there to look at him.”

There are usually more sightings of alligators in Phillips and Lee Counties.

It is believed alligators were introduced years ago in St. Francis County to help cut down on the beaver population.

But a spokesperson with the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission says the public should not be alarmed if one is spotted in the wild.

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